Career Articles https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss Career Articles for One Aggie Network en Career Corner: The Importance of Employer Info Sessions https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/employer-info-sessions <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Career Corner: The Importance of Employer Info Sessions</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">February 11, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/uc-davis-careers.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=kYmoin8l" width="1280" height="720" alt="Group of people sitting at long table" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="By Ken Barnes Why are employer info sessions crucial to the job search? First, let’s start with what an info session is. Employer information sessions are 1 -2 hour lectures, presentations, or talks given by representatives and recruiters. They offer insight into companies, position requirements, culture and more. Benefits to your student for attending info sessions include: Learning more about employers of interest Networking and developing professional contacts Learning about internships, co-ops and job opportunities Learning about company structure, fit and potential Food is often served, and swag is often given away Obtaining interviews directly from company reps Employers generally offer info sessions under two circumstances: after career fairs to capitalize on campus visits (often because travel is involved) and during the year to attract students. If a company has offered an info session after a career fair, your student should strongly consider going –– even if they didn’t sign up for an interview. Career fairs can be hectic, and your student may only have a few minutes to talk to reps. Info sessions give significantly more insight and are unofficially considered a requirement for interviews. Many representatives also hold interview spots for those who attend, so attending can be a quick an easy way of getting past the first step of the hiring process and getting the interview. Attending an info session also shows an employer that a student has a strong interest in that company, and is a chance to gain additional information they may not get before the interview. Also, when your student interacts with the employer they are actually being interviewed, and their responses may help them get hired. Any time your student talks with an employer they should consider it as an interview, and can use that info session to make a great first impression for the official interview. Tips on successful info sessions: Dress professionally—business casual or professional. Ask questions. Do research and prepare quality questions to ask during the presentation. Bring copies of your resume and business cards if you have them. Don’t be shy! Reps expect to interact with students and share their experiences and knowledge. They are more likely to remember students who show initiative and chat with them. Also, think on your feet and respond to things they say by asking meaningful, related questions. Get a good feel for the company by talking to more than one representative. After the info session, look up each rep on LinkedIn. If you build up a rapport with them, consider connecting with them. I would be remiss if I didn’t state what not to do during info sessions: Don’t grab food and walk out early. Reps may not remember you, but they’ll remember UC Davis. It may be a factor in deciding to come back. Don’t go just for swag. Talk to companies, then wait to be offered swag. Don’t go unprepared. It’s a networking event, so prepare your 30-second pitch. If you don’t have one, contact the Internship and Career Center or do research on how to prepare one. Also, practice before you go! Don’t leave early unless you absolutely have to. Remember, you are an ambassador of the university. Represent UC Davis well! To find out about upcoming info sessions, have your student log into Aggie Job Link. An RSVP is encouraged but not required. For more questions, contact the Internship and Career Center or go to our website at http://icc.ucdavis.edu. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "By Ken Barnes Why are employer info sessions crucial to the job search? First, let’s start with what an info session is. Employer information sessions are 1 -2 hour lectures, presentations, or talks given by representatives and recruiters. They offer insight into companies, position requirements, culture and more. Benefits to your student for attending info sessions include:" } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>By Ken Barnes</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Why are employer info sessions crucial to the job search? First, let’s start with what an info session is. Employer information sessions are 1 -2 hour lectures, presentations, or talks given by representatives and recruiters. They offer insight into companies, position requirements, culture and more. </span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Benefits to your student for attending info sessions include:</span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span>Learning more about employers of interest</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Networking and developing professional contacts</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Learning about internships, co-ops and job opportunities</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Learning about company structure, fit and potential</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Food is often served, and swag is often given away</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Obtaining interviews directly from company reps</span></span></span></li> </ul><p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Employers generally offer info sessions under two circumstances: after career fairs to capitalize on campus visits (often because travel is involved) and during the year to attract students. If a company has offered an info session after a career fair, your student should strongly consider going –– even if they didn’t sign up for an interview. Career fairs can be hectic, and your student may only have a few minutes to talk to reps. Info sessions give significantly more insight and are unofficially considered a requirement for interviews. Many representatives also hold interview spots for those who attend, so attending can be a quick an easy way of getting past the first step of the hiring process and getting the interview.</span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Attending an info session also shows an employer that a student has a strong interest in that company, and is a chance to gain additional information they may not get before the interview. Also, when your student interacts with the employer they are actually being interviewed, and their responses may help them get hired. Any time your student talks with an employer they should consider it as an interview, and can use that info session to make a great first impression for the official interview.</span></span></span></p> <h5><span><span><span>Tips on successful info sessions:</span></span></span></h5> <ul><li><span><span><span>Dress professionally—business casual or professional. </span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Ask questions. Do research and prepare quality questions to ask during the presentation.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Bring copies of your resume and business cards if you have them.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Don’t be shy! Reps expect to interact with students and share their experiences and knowledge. They are more likely to remember students who show initiative and chat with them. Also, think on your feet and respond to things they say by asking meaningful, related questions.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Get a good feel for the company by talking to more than one representative.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>After the info session, look up each rep on LinkedIn. If you build up a rapport with them, consider connecting with them.</span></span></span></li> </ul><h5><span><span><span>I would be remiss if I didn’t state what not to do during info sessions:</span></span></span></h5> <ul><li><span><span><span>Don’t grab food and walk out early. Reps may not remember you, but they’ll remember UC Davis. It may be a factor in deciding to come back.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Don’t go just for swag. Talk to companies, then wait to be offered swag.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Don’t go unprepared. It’s a networking event, so prepare your 30-second pitch. If you don’t have one, contact the Internship and Career Center or do research on how to prepare one. Also, practice before you go!</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Don’t leave early unless you absolutely have to. Remember, you are an ambassador of the university. Represent UC Davis well!</span></span></span></li> </ul><p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>To find out about upcoming info sessions, have your student log into <span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find/resources/ajl">Aggie Job Link</a></span></span>. An RSVP is encouraged but not required. For more questions, contact the Internship and Career Center or go to our website at <span><span><a href="http://icc.ucdavis.edu">http://icc.ucdavis.edu</a></span></span>. </span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/career" hreflang="en">Career</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/student-alumni-association" hreflang="en">Student Alumni Association</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Feb 2019 19:14:33 +0000 Anonymous 4321 at https://alumni.ucdavis.edu Career Corner: Careers in Data https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/data-careeers <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Career Corner: Careers in Data</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">January 09, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/uc-davis-data-careers.jpg?h=060060ec&amp;itok=mondf19i" width="1280" height="720" alt="UC Davis students sitting in a classroom in front of computers" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Robin Reshwan, as seen on US News Data. Many of us may think “data” is just a line item on our cell phone bill where we are penalized if we used too much that month. In the business world, data is on the mind of every CEO. How to acquire customer data? How to use data to determine buying patterns? How to keep confidential data safe? These questions have resulted in a wave of new(er) career paths – and our workforce does not have enough qualified employees to match the hiring. Here are two paths to consider if you want to participate in these fast growing professions. Marketing Analytics Marketing departments are huge consumers of data and technology. A prediction by Garter (a leading research firm) estimated that the heads of marketing will actually spend more on information technology than the Chief Information Officers. Businesses of every kind want to know more about their customers and want to create practices that make it easier to target the right customers at the best time in an effort to increase sales efficiently. Most entry level marketing careers begin by learning the technology tools available to capture customer preferences, identify buying patterns and market goods/services. Proficiency with the software tools leads you to where data and ideas converge. Initiatives measured by analytics drive most marketing efforts in mid to large firms. Things like “click through rates” and determining the “return on investment” for specific marketing campaigns or strategies give executives information about what is actually working (and what is not a good use of time). If you are pursuing a career in marketing, be prepared to demonstrate more than just good ideas - as a matter of fact, your ideas may not even be needed for many years to come. Instead, show how you have increased followers, expanded online communities, grew user engagement and ultimately had an impact on revenue because of your analysis of data. Let the numbers show your marketing potential. Data Science Ever wanted to be a treasure hunter? Maybe you have a knack for solving puzzles, finding “glitches” or seeing the piece that is out of place? Good news – you might be a natural data scientist. “Since it&#039;s not a one-dimensional discipline, data scientists can emerge from just about any field. A good data scientist is someone who has the right tools (math, programming, critical thinking), is self-sufficient (doesn&#039;t need someone else to implement his or her ideas) and has an interest in understanding the context in which the skills can be applied. This is what the marketplace seeks.” (http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/data-scientist-the-sexiest-job-no-one- has/d/d-id/1112832) But why pursue a data driven role versus a more traditional math or programming role? Eric Haller, executive vice president and global head of Experian Data Labs, gives this explanation: “Data Science offers continuous exploration. It is a multidisciplinary career path. You look for things that others may not have seen – patterns to tell a story. Furthermore, the stronger your skills, you can tackle more complex and intriguing problems – marketing, fraud, credit risk.” A safe way to explore the career path while a student or a new Computer Science or Mathematics graduate, advises Haller, is to try out some online courses in data hygiene, data management, data infrastructure, analytics, statistics and machine learning. If the online learning piques your interest, then you can pursue an advanced degree in data science. A career may start as a data engineer, tasked with cleaning up data sets. Over time, and possibly with an even more advanced degree, you can move to a data scientist role where you tackle business and security problems more comprehensively using your technical and analytical skills. If you are pursuing career growth in the field, Haller suggests that you be prepared to demonstrate your math, programming and data management skills in interviewing situations and actively network to learn more about the companies and industries best suited for your interests. Also, there are considerably more opportunities in certain regions of the United States - Seattle, San Francisco Bay Area, Boston, New York, Austin, Charlotte/Raleigh and San Diego. The highest concentration of roles is near the technology and financial centers. Relocation may be necessary for career progression. “I keep saying that the sexy job in the next 10 years will to be statisticians, and I’m not kidding,” said Hal Varian, the chief economist at Google in 2009. Move over programmers and software engineers. Analysts, engineers and scientists who can manipulate huge amounts of data and emerge with powerful insights that impact strategic decisions are now the ideal professions for career minded high achievers. With its rapid rate of growth and unparalleled employment potential, the future is bright for those who pursue big data.” "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Robin Reshwan, as seen on US News Data. Many of us may think “data” is just a line item on our cell phone bill where we are penalized if we used too much that month. In the business world, data is on the mind of every CEO. How to acquire customer data? How to use data to determine buying patterns? How to keep confidential data safe?" } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Robin Reshwan, as seen on <em>US News</em></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Data. Many of us may think “data” is just a line item on our cell phone bill where we are penalized if we used too much that month. In the business world, data is on the mind of every CEO. How to acquire customer data? How to use data to determine buying patterns? How to keep confidential data safe?</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>These questions have resulted in a wave of new(er) career paths – and our workforce does not have enough qualified employees to match the hiring. Here are two paths to consider if you want to participate in these fast growing professions.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h5><span><span><span><span><span><strong>Marketing Analytics </strong></span></span></span></span></span></h5> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Marketing departments are huge consumers of data and technology. A prediction by Garter (a leading research firm) estimated that the heads of marketing will actually spend more on information technology than the Chief Information Officers. Businesses of every kind want to know more about their customers and want to create practices that make it easier to target the right customers at the best time in an effort to increase sales efficiently.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Most entry level marketing careers begin by learning the technology tools available to capture customer preferences, identify buying patterns and market goods/services. Proficiency with the software tools leads you to where data and ideas converge. Initiatives measured by analytics drive most marketing efforts in mid to large firms. Things like “click through rates” and determining the “return on investment” for specific marketing campaigns or strategies give executives information about what is actually working (and what is not a good use of time). If you are pursuing a career in marketing, be prepared to demonstrate more than just good ideas - as a matter of fact, your ideas may not even be needed for many years to come. Instead, show how you have increased followers, expanded online communities, grew user engagement and ultimately had an impact on revenue because of your analysis of data. Let the numbers show your marketing potential.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h5><span><span><span><span><span><strong>Data Science </strong></span></span></span></span></span></h5> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Ever wanted to be a treasure hunter? Maybe you have a knack for solving puzzles, finding “glitches” or seeing the piece that is out of place? Good news – you might be a natural data scientist. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>“Since it's not a one-dimensional discipline, data scientists can emerge from just about any field. A good data scientist is someone who has the right tools (math, programming, critical thinking), is self-sufficient (doesn't need someone else to implement his or her ideas) and has an interest in understanding the <em>context </em>in which the skills can be applied. This is what the marketplace seeks.” (<span><a href="http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/data-scientist-the-sexiest-job-no-one-has/d/d-id/1112832"><span>http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/data-scientist-the-sexiest-job-no-one-</span></a></span><span> <a href="http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/data-scientist-the-sexiest-job-no-one-has/d/d-id/1112832"><span>has/d/d-id/1112832</span></a></span><span>)</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>But why pursue a data driven role versus a more traditional math or programming role? Eric Haller, executive vice president and global head of Experian Data Labs, gives this explanation: “Data Science offers continuous exploration. It is a multidisciplinary career path. You look for things that others may not have seen – patterns to tell a story. Furthermore, the stronger your skills, you can tackle more complex and intriguing problems – marketing, fraud, credit risk.”</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>A safe way to explore the career path while a student or a new Computer Science or Mathematics graduate, advises Haller, is to try out some online courses in data hygiene, data management, data infrastructure, analytics, statistics and machine learning. If the online learning piques your interest, then</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>you can pursue an advanced degree in data science. A career may start as a data engineer, tasked with cleaning up data sets. Over time, and possibly with an even more advanced degree, you can move to a data scientist role where you tackle business and security problems more comprehensively using your technical and analytical skills.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>If you are pursuing career growth in the field, Haller suggests that you be prepared to demonstrate your math, programming and data management skills in interviewing situations and actively network to learn more about the companies and industries best suited for your interests. Also, there are considerably more opportunities in certain regions of the United States - Seattle, San Francisco Bay Area, Boston, New York, Austin, Charlotte/Raleigh and San Diego. The highest concentration of roles is near the technology and financial centers. Relocation may be necessary for career progression.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>“I keep saying that the sexy job in the next 10 years will to be statisticians, and I’m not kidding,” said Hal Varian, the chief economist at Google in 2009. Move over programmers and software engineers. Analysts, engineers and scientists who can manipulate huge amounts of data and emerge with powerful insights that impact strategic decisions are now the ideal professions for career minded high achievers. With its rapid rate of growth and unparalleled employment potential, the future is bright for those who pursue big data.”</span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/career" hreflang="en">Career</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 09 Jan 2019 21:28:37 +0000 Anonymous 4216 at https://alumni.ucdavis.edu Tips to Capitalize on a Summer Internship https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/tips-capitalize-summer-internship <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Tips to Capitalize on a Summer Internship</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 08, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/807A7202.jpg?h=c673cd1c&amp;itok=29cNqMz8" width="1280" height="720" alt="UC Davis students interacting with an alumna at a career fair" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="By Robin Reshwan Summer internships are excellent opportunities for college students to acquire valuable skills, collaborate with experienced professionals and expand their network. With summer winding down and students returning to campus, it is an ideal time for interns to take a few extra steps to capitalize on their work experience. Here are two impactful things your student should do at the end of an internship. First, determine who can be a business reference (and what they will say). If your student is confident in his performance, he should ask at least two managers if they would be willing to be a reference and what their preferred method of contact is for future requests. If he is lucky enough to have multiple choices for references, he should look for people with good tenure and the highest-level title who can still speak personally about him. If your student was unsure of his performance, this is a little trickier. He should still ask a couple of managers or more senior colleagues if they can be a reference. He may also want to ask them what they would recommend that he continue to work on for future career success. A potential reference who gives a long list of ways to improve is probably not someone who will sing your praises on a reference call. A manager who gladly says she will help you and gives you only one or two pointers might be a safer bet. If someone goes into an explanation regarding the company&#039;s policy prohibiting references or how difficult it is to get in touch with them, that is a clear sign that this person is not going to be a good reference. It may sound obvious but remind your student to not give out the name of a reference unless he knows that she will say good-to-great things. It does not pay to gamble with the choice of references. Additionally, your student should update his resume and LinkedIn now. Before he leaves work or shortly thereafter is the best time because the responsibilities and impact are fresh. Additionally, he can ask current work connections if they would be willing to give him feedback on his depiction of the internship before he adds it to his resume and LinkedIn profile. Often, interns will just list their job description as the update. It is highly preferable to prioritize the tasks that are most professionally relevant and accomplishments that are most valuable. Select concise but action-oriented wording to really improve the messaging. Asking his work colleagues for their advice regarding his updates is a high-impact way to remind them of accomplishments and to ensure he has created a compelling resume or employment summary. Hopefully, your student’s summer internship was a rewarding and educational experience. To fully leverage the power of an internship, encourage him to set up business references and make updates to him resume and LinkedIn profile while everything is still in the front of his mind. With these two steps, he will be ready to go for fall career fairs and subsequent interviews on campus without the last-minute scramble to be prepared. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "By Robin Reshwan Summer internships are excellent opportunities for college students to acquire valuable skills, collaborate with experienced professionals and expand their network. With summer winding down and students returning to campus, it is an ideal time for interns to take a few extra steps to capitalize on their work experience. Here are two impactful things your student should do at the end of an internship." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>By Robin Reshwan</p> <p>Summer internships are excellent opportunities for college students to acquire valuable skills, collaborate with experienced professionals and expand their network. With summer winding down and students returning to campus, it is an ideal time for interns to take a few extra steps to capitalize on their work experience. Here are two impactful things your student should do at the end of an internship.</p> <p>First, <strong>determine who can be a business reference</strong> (and what they will say). If your student is confident in his performance, he should ask at least two managers if they would be willing to be a reference and what their preferred method of contact is for future requests. If he is lucky enough to have multiple choices for references, he should look for people with good tenure and the highest-level title who can still speak personally about him.</p> <p>If your student was unsure of his performance, this is a little trickier. He should still ask a couple of managers or more senior colleagues if they can be a reference. He may also want to ask them what they would recommend that he continue to work on for future career success. A potential reference who gives a long list of ways to improve is probably not someone who will sing your praises on a reference call. A manager who gladly says she will help you and gives you only one or two pointers might be a safer bet. If someone goes into an explanation regarding the company's policy prohibiting references or how difficult it is to get in touch with them, that is a clear sign that this person is not going to be a good reference. It may sound obvious but remind your student to not give out the name of a reference unless he knows that she will say good-to-great things. It does not pay to gamble with the choice of references.</p> <p>Additionally, your student should <strong>update his resume and LinkedIn now</strong>. Before he leaves work or shortly thereafter is the best time because the responsibilities and impact are fresh. Additionally, he can ask current work connections if they would be willing to give him feedback on his depiction of the internship before he adds it to his resume and LinkedIn profile. Often, interns will just list their job description as the update. It is highly preferable to prioritize the tasks that are most professionally relevant and accomplishments that are most valuable. Select concise but action-oriented wording to really improve the messaging. Asking his work colleagues for their advice regarding his updates is a high-impact way to remind them of accomplishments and to ensure he has created a compelling resume or employment summary.</p> <p>Hopefully, your student’s summer internship was a rewarding and educational experience. To fully leverage the power of an internship, encourage him to set up business references and make updates to him resume and LinkedIn profile while everything is still in the front of his mind. With these two steps, he will be ready to go for fall career fairs and subsequent interviews on campus without the last-minute scramble to be prepared.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/career" hreflang="en">Career</a></div> </div> </div> Sat, 08 Sep 2018 17:06:07 +0000 Anonymous 4001 at https://alumni.ucdavis.edu Janet Elsea: How to Make a Lasting Impression in Your Field https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/janet-elsea-how-make-lasting-impression-your-field <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Janet Elsea: How to Make a Lasting Impression in Your Field</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/8826" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Katherine Lee</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 24, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/janet-elsea-making-lasting-impressions-communications-specialist-four-minute-sell-author-PHOTO-1.jpg?h=732b197c&amp;itok=6KXYXJ7o" width="1280" height="720" alt="UC Davis alumna Janet Elsea speaking to UC Davis theater students" title="Janet Elsea speaks to theatre students about the importance of communications in building their careers." typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Theatre and Speech Department alumna Janet Elsea ‘64, M.A. ‘66 recently returned to the University of California, Davis to speak to theatre students.  She emphasized using their passion and strengths creatively to make lasting impressions in their career field. Her advice is especially significant as many Aggies approach commencement and begin to enter the job market for the first time, and it may also be helpful for Aggies making a career change. Elsea led a successful consulting business and became a renowned authority and international expert in communication, working with prominent corporate and political figures – including Janet Napolitano, then governor of Arizona and current president of the UC system. Elsea authored First Impression, Best Impression, translated into 3 languages. A Cal Aggie Alumni Association Lifetime Member and UC Davis donor, Elsea is happy to find ways to support her alma matter and be a part of the university’s ongoing transformation. She said, “It is wonderful to be back and see what this institution has done for peoples’ lives.” Establishing a Creative New Direction in Her Field Janet Elsea, international speaker and author, with Shaun Keister, Vice Chancellor of Development and Alumni Relations.Elsea held many leadership positions throughout her studies and career, paving the way for women to pursue higher degrees in the arts and tenure in academia. She was the first woman to earn a master’s degree in UC Davis’ theatre department, to receive her doctorate from the University of Iowa in over a decade and to become the first female associate professor at Arizona State University’s Department of Speech and Theatre. When asked about some of the major highlights in her career, Elsea mentioned a proud moment at Arizona State University: “I’d been a feminist, founder and first President of ASU’s Faculty Women’s Association,” she explains. “I leaked salary studies to the local Phoenix newspaper, proving the salary disparity between women and men of similar rank. Administrators said ‘Give her tenure because otherwise she will sue, but let’s find a reason not to promote her.’ It was a great challenge – I was proud to stand up to them – and to go on to prove I could make something of my career without them.” Elsea successfully used her theatre knowledge from her time at UC Davis to change directions and eventually launch her consulting business. “[As alumni], it’s important to speak to students today so that we have people of color, women, men, transgendered, young people, senior people, communicating with us. This is what life is all about.” –Janet Elsea Expert Communication Tips for Being Confident in Your Field “Communication is the sharing of meaning,” Elsea explains. “What is on your face, the tone of your voice, the words you choose, and how you put them together is all meaningful. It is why communication is at the root of nearly all interactions. No matter what field you are in — you are expected to present your ideas. Whether at staff meetings, in a phone meeting with a client, in a conference — it is all public communication.” Elsea’s theatre degree allowed her to specialize in how to best communicate and find an authentic voice — whatever your chosen field. She recommends four key tips for mastering your communication skills and making the best possible first impression: Dress the part. What does your appearance say about what you want to communicate? Body language and facial expressions should be consistent with the meaning behind what you are saying. Project your voice. Does your sound quality tend to fade at the end of your sentences? Or does it remain strong to the end of the sentence or section? Frame your ideas. How do you tie the points you are making together? A strong framework encourages the listener from beginning to middle to end. Be a good listener, but be sure to get your points across. It is best to be brief, direct, and to the point. “Keep it short and simple stupid. KISSS is my motto,” she laughs. Facing significant health challenges not once, but twice, allowed Elsea to realize the importance of following her passion and pursuing her creative area of expertise. It’s what helped her to be so successful and creative in her career change. At commencement, the time of year when Aggies are looking to the future and reflecting on how far they have come, she leaves us with the question: Am I following my passion into the future? Looking for ways to stay in touch with the UC Davis community into the future? Become a mentor or volunteer or support additional opportunities to give back to UC Davis. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Alumna communications expert shares four tips for Aggies entering the job market or embarking on a career change " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>Theatre and Speech Department alumna Janet Elsea ‘64, M.A. ‘66 recently returned to the University of California, Davis to speak to theatre students.  She emphasized using their passion and strengths creatively to make lasting impressions in their career field. Her advice is especially significant as many Aggies approach commencement and begin to enter the job market for the first time, and it may also be helpful for Aggies making a career change. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Elsea led a successful consulting business and became a <a href="http://arts.ucdavis.edu/event/alumnaauthor-conversation">renowned authority and international expert</a> in communication, working with prominent corporate and political figures – including Janet Napolitano, then governor of Arizona and current president of the UC system. Elsea authored <em>First Impression, Best Impression, </em>translated into 3 languages. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>A Cal Aggie Alumni Association Lifetime Member and UC Davis donor, Elsea is happy to find ways to <a href="https://ucdavis.imodules.com/s/1768/alumni/index2col.aspx?sid=1768&amp;gid=2&amp;sitebuilder=1&amp;pgid=414">support her alma matter</a> and be a part of the university’s ongoing transformation. She said, “It is wonderful to be back and see what this institution has done for peoples’ lives.”</span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong>Establishing a Creative New Direction in Her Field</strong></span></span></span></h4> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-left"><img alt="UC Davis alumna Janet Elsea and Vice Chancellor Shaun Keister" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="257c9077-7ccd-43bd-981b-da89073da64c" height="201" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/inline-images/Janet-Elsea-making-lasting-connections-four-minute-sell-uc-davis-alumna-....jpg" width="268" /><figcaption>Janet Elsea, international speaker and author, with Shaun Keister, Vice Chancellor of Development and Alumni Relations.</figcaption></figure><p><span><span><span>Elsea held many leadership positions throughout her studies and career, paving the way for women to pursue higher degrees in the arts and tenure in academia. She was the first woman to earn a master’s degree in <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/department-theatre-and-dance">UC Davis’ theatre department</a>, to receive her doctorate from the University of Iowa in over a decade and to become the first female associate professor at Arizona State University’s Department of Speech and Theatre.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>When asked about some of the major highlights in her career, Elsea mentioned a proud moment at Arizona State University:</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“I’d been a feminist, founder and first President of ASU’s Faculty Women’s Association,” she explains. “I leaked salary studies to the local Phoenix newspaper, proving the salary disparity between women and men of similar rank. Administrators said ‘Give her tenure because otherwise she will sue, but let’s find a reason not to promote her.’ It was a great challenge – I was proud to stand up to them – and to go on to prove I could make something of my career without them.”</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Elsea successfully used her theatre knowledge from her time at UC Davis to change directions and eventually launch her consulting business.</span></span></span><span><span><span> </span></span></span></p> <blockquote> <p><span><span>“[As alumni], it’s important to speak to students today so that we have people of color, women, men, transgendered, young people, senior people, communicating with us. This is what life is all about.” –Janet Elsea</span></span></p> </blockquote> <h4><span><span><span><strong>Expert Communication Tips for Being Confident in Your Field</strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span>“Communication is the sharing of meaning,” Elsea explains. “What is on your face, the tone of your voice, the words you choose, and how you put them together is all meaningful. It is why communication is at the root of nearly all interactions. No matter what field you are in — you are expected to present your ideas. Whether at staff meetings, in a phone meeting with a client, in a conference — it is all public communication.” </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Elsea’s theatre degree allowed her to specialize in how to best communicate and find an authentic voice — whatever your chosen field. She recommends four key tips for mastering your communication skills and making the best possible first impression<strong>:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ol><li><span><span><span><strong>Dress the part</strong>. What does your appearance say about what you want to communicate? Body language and facial expressions should be consistent with the meaning behind what you are saying.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong>Project your voice</strong>. Does your sound quality tend to fade at the end of your sentences? Or does it remain strong to the end of the sentence or section?</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong>Frame your ideas</strong>. How do you tie the points you are making together? A strong framework encourages the listener from beginning to middle to end.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong>Be a good listener</strong>, but be sure to get your points across. It is best to be brief, direct, and to the point. </span></span></span></li> </ol><p><span><span><span><strong>“</strong>Keep it short and simple stupid. KISSS is my motto,” she laughs. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Facing significant health challenges not once, but twice, allowed Elsea to realize the importance of following her passion and pursuing her creative area of expertise. It’s what helped her to be so successful and creative in her career change. At commencement, the time of year when Aggies are looking to the future and reflecting on how far they have come, she leaves us with the question: Am I following my passion into the future?</span></span></span></p> <div class="alert"><span><span><span><em>Looking for ways to stay in touch with the UC Davis community into the future? Become a </em><a href="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/get-connected/volunteer/"><em>mentor or volunteer</em></a><em> or support additional opportunities</em><em> to </em><a href="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/get-connected/give-back"><em>give back to UC Davis</em></a><em>.</em></span></span></span></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/career" hreflang="en">Career</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 24 May 2018 15:44:45 +0000 Katherine Lee 2781 at https://alumni.ucdavis.edu 8 Tips for Optimizing Your LinkedIn https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/8-tips-optimizing-your-linkedin <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">8 Tips for Optimizing Your LinkedIn</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">June 13, 2017</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20171108_jarvis_jeff_05%2520%281%29.jpg?h=c673cd1c&amp;itok=h3Fi4SXd" width="1280" height="720" alt="UC Davis alumnus networking with UC Davis students" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Invest in a professional-quality headshot. Better yet, work with your local chapter or network to organize an event where ambassadors will take your headshot. Email alumni@ucdavis.edu for more information. Don’t just make the connection—make time for the care and feeding of your network. Periodically calling or sending personalized notes will distinguish you. Take advantage of LinkedIn’s free tutorials to familiarize yourself with the site’s features. Their tools for managing your activity feed and strategically ordering your profile content are among the most important to understand. Did you know LinkedIn can be used as a database? Explore the different ways you can drill down into the Aggie network using the “Find Alumni” tool (the third option under “Connections” in the top left toolbar). Strike a balance between industry-specific keywords and active verbs in your position descriptions. Cross-reference your content against LinkedIn’s annual blog post about the most overused buzzwords. Join and actively participate in relevant LinkedIn groups. Block off weekly or biweekly time to participate in discussions and/or answer questions to build public awareness of your expertise. Evaluate profiles that impress you. What is appealing about them? What elements can you adopt and personalize? Go with your gut. There are countless tips to consider, but ultimately your online presence should accurately reflect your values, goals and professional persona. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Read eight tips for optimizing your profile on LinkedIn from Cal Aggie Alumni Association. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><ul><li>Invest in a professional-quality headshot. Better yet, work with your local chapter or network to organize an event where ambassadors will take your headshot. Email <a href="mailto:alumni%40ucdavis.edu">alumni@ucdavis.edu</a> for more information.</li> <li>Don’t just make the connection—make time for the care and feeding of your network. Periodically calling or sending personalized notes will distinguish you.</li> <li>Take advantage of LinkedIn’s <a href="http://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/530">free tutorials</a> to familiarize yourself with the site’s features. Their tools for managing your activity feed and strategically ordering your profile content are among the most important to understand.</li> <li>Did you know LinkedIn can be used as a database? Explore the different ways you can drill down into the Aggie network using the “Find Alumni” tool (the third option under “Connections” in the top left toolbar).</li> <li>Strike a balance between industry-specific keywords and active verbs in your position descriptions. Cross-reference your content against LinkedIn’s annual blog post about the most overused buzzwords.</li> <li>Join and actively participate in relevant LinkedIn groups. Block off weekly or biweekly time to participate in discussions and/or answer questions to build public awareness of your expertise.</li> <li>Evaluate profiles that impress you. What is appealing about them? What elements can you adopt and personalize?</li> <li>Go with your gut. There are countless tips to consider, but ultimately your online presence should accurately reflect your values, goals and professional persona.</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/career" hreflang="en">Career</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 13 Jun 2017 17:40:30 +0000 Anonymous 2926 at https://alumni.ucdavis.edu Building Your Career: Making the Most of the CAAA Network https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/building-your-career-making-most-caaa-network <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Building Your Career: Making the Most of the CAAA Network</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">June 12, 2016</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/18136166_10155120838434336_2885201_n.jpg?h=dec22bcf&amp;itok=X_bbh-Jv" width="1280" height="720" alt="UC Davis Alumni sign" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="The foundation of successful networking is an attitude geared toward helping others, without quid pro quo expectations. “In a world that is filled with generic and mass appeal marketing, making a unique connection is extremely valuable,” says Robin Reshwan ’92, who is a contributing blogger for U.S. News: On Careers. “One of the best ways to distinguish yourself is to start a relationship through giving, as opposed to taking. People like to work with others that they know and trust. The relationships built through ‘giving back’ tend to be more substantial and longer lasting than those that are just one-sided.” CAAA offers programs for alumni to connect with current students: Join in a career panel - panels occur throughout the year Take an Aggie to Work: Host a student for a day of job shadowing at your workplace. Aggie Diner: This award-winning program gives students the opportunity to meet with professionals in a wide range of fields. Enjoy a three-course meal while sharing your insights with students and networking with other alumni. Interview with an Aggie: Provide feedback to students in a mock interview and network with fellow alumni afterwards. For more information on any of these programs, email alumni@ucdavis.edu. Reshwan emphasizes the importance of keeping an open mind toward who might be a part of your network. “Cast a wide net when networking since you never know who may be that key connector between you and your next opportunity,” says Reshwan, a CAAA member since 1993. “Remember to have a clear, concise explanation of what you are looking to accomplish to make it easy for your connection to be of assistance. Have a ‘personal commercial’ that explains who you are and where you are looking to go.” “There is no prescribed secret sauce for networking, the secret is to try. As UC Davis taught me so well, you will get out what you put in and you will get better at it along the way with your own unique style,” says Cody Noghera ’05, Director of the Corporate Affiliates Program at UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering and a CAAA San Diego network leader. “One of the simplest ways to get involved is to show up at local alumni events. Remember, you’ve already got one thing in common with everyone there: an affinity with UC Davis. And chapter and network leaders will be right there waiting to meet you.” Everyone is professionally judged on his or her online presence, like it or not, and making sure a Google search of your name makes a good impression involves more than adjusting your Facebook privacy settings. Digital portfolios aren’t just for those working in visual fields or with HTML skills — everyone can share professional or academic projects online. Sharing the best examples of your work enhances your credibility and makes you far more memorable. The benefits of continuously honing and growing your skillset are manifold, including helping you re-engage with your current position or preparing you for a new challenge. Besides being crucial to staying competitive in the job market, it is an ideal opportunity to develop meaningful connections over time with fellow participants. “All successful businesses strive to keep in front of their customers’ needs and competitors’ service offerings to keep their companies relevant. Smart employees should do the same,” says Reshwan. “You are the manager of your career. Always look for ways to develop your knowledge and skills through classes, new projects and other avenues of learning. When you push yourself to develop, you increase professional confidence, give yourself a competitive advantage and display your commitment to your career.” If the price tag for formal continuing education is out of your reach, think creatively. Volunteer work is a free and fulfilling way to expand your skillset, explore new fields and meet new people. CAAA members receive a discount on UC Davis Extension classes, and you can also take advantage of their free information sessions to learn about industry trends. Or build an hour or two into your week for reading about the field or skills you’re interested in—CAAA members enjoy free borrowing privileges at all of UC Davis’ four libraries and the libraries on all 10 UC campuses. If you’re very short on time and money, strategic participation in LinkedIn group discussions is a free way to learn and enhance your online presence at the same time. If making time for networking seems impossible, remember that it can be as simple as having coffee with a fellow Aggie. Pick one or two small goals and focus on the benefits of networking: new connections and serendipitous circumstances. “Networking connects you to so many new people and opportunities,” says Cookie Lee (Debra Lee ’78), founder and former CEO of her eponymous multi-milliondollar jewelry company. “The most important thing is to just start! Network wherever you go. Be prepared by being open, being excited about meeting new people, and having your business card ready. Focus on what you can give to other people, and it will come back to you a bazillion-fold.” "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "The foundation of successful networking is an attitude geared toward helping others, without quid pro quo expectations." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The foundation of successful networking is an attitude geared toward helping others, without quid pro quo expectations.</p> <p>“In a world that is filled with generic and mass appeal marketing, making a unique connection is extremely valuable,” says Robin Reshwan ’92, who is a contributing blogger for U.S. News: On Careers. “One of the best ways to distinguish yourself is to start a relationship through giving, as opposed to taking. People like to work with others that they know and trust. The relationships built through ‘giving back’ tend to be more substantial and longer lasting than those that are just one-sided.”</p> <p>CAAA offers programs for alumni to connect with current students:</p> <ul><li><strong>Join in a career panel</strong> - panels occur throughout the year</li> <li><strong>Take an Aggie to Work:</strong> Host a student for a day of job shadowing at your workplace.</li> <li><strong>Aggie Diner:</strong> This award-winning program gives students the opportunity to meet with professionals in a wide range of fields. Enjoy a three-course meal while sharing your insights with students and networking with other alumni.</li> <li><strong>Interview with an Aggie:</strong> Provide feedback to students in a mock interview and network with fellow alumni afterwards.</li> </ul><p>For more information on any of these programs, email <a href="mailto:alumni@ucdavis.edu">alumni@ucdavis.edu</a>.</p> <p>Reshwan emphasizes the importance of keeping an open mind toward who might be a part of your network. “Cast a wide net when networking since you never know who may be that key connector between you and your next opportunity,” says Reshwan, a CAAA member since 1993. “Remember to have a clear, concise explanation of what you are looking to accomplish to make it easy for your connection to be of assistance. Have a ‘personal commercial’ that explains who you are and where you are looking to go.”</p> <p>“There is no prescribed secret sauce for networking, the secret is to try. As UC Davis taught me so well, you will get out what you put in and you will get better at it along the way with your own unique style,” says Cody Noghera ’05, Director of the Corporate Affiliates Program at UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering and a CAAA San Diego network leader. “One of the simplest ways to get involved is to show up at local alumni events. Remember, you’ve already got one thing in common with everyone there: an affinity with UC Davis. And chapter and network leaders will be right there waiting to meet you.”</p> <p>Everyone is professionally judged on his or her online presence, like it or not, and making sure a Google search of your name makes a good impression involves more than adjusting your Facebook privacy settings. Digital portfolios aren’t just for those working in visual fields or with HTML skills — everyone can share professional or academic projects online. Sharing the best examples of your work enhances your credibility and makes you far more memorable.</p> <p>The benefits of continuously honing and growing your skillset are manifold, including helping you re-engage with your current position or preparing you for a new challenge. Besides being crucial to staying competitive in the job market, it is an ideal opportunity to develop meaningful connections over time with fellow participants. “All successful businesses strive to keep in front of their customers’ needs and competitors’ service offerings to keep their companies relevant. Smart employees should do the same,” says Reshwan. “You are the manager of your career. Always look for ways to develop your knowledge and skills through classes, new projects and other avenues of learning. When you push yourself to develop, you increase professional confidence, give yourself a competitive advantage and display your commitment to your career.”</p> <p>If the price tag for formal continuing education is out of your reach, think creatively. Volunteer work is a free and fulfilling way to expand your skillset, explore new fields and meet new people. CAAA members receive a discount on UC Davis Extension classes, and you can also take advantage of their free information sessions to learn about industry trends. Or build an hour or two into your week for reading about the field or skills you’re interested in—CAAA members enjoy free borrowing privileges at all of UC Davis’ four libraries and the libraries on all 10 UC campuses. If you’re very short on time and money, strategic participation in LinkedIn group discussions is a free way to learn and enhance your online presence at the same time.</p> <p>If making time for networking seems impossible, remember that it can be as simple as having coffee with a fellow Aggie. Pick one or two small goals and focus on the benefits of networking: new connections and serendipitous circumstances.</p> <p>“Networking connects you to so many new people and opportunities,” says Cookie Lee (Debra Lee ’78), founder and former CEO of her eponymous multi-milliondollar jewelry company. “The most important thing is to just start! Network wherever you go. Be prepared by being open, being excited about meeting new people, and having your business card ready. Focus on what you can give to other people, and it will come back to you a bazillion-fold.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/career" hreflang="en">Career</a></div> </div> </div> Sun, 12 Jun 2016 23:30:15 +0000 Anonymous 2921 at https://alumni.ucdavis.edu